Split Rock Lighthouse – Yashica Electro 35

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The Yashica Electro 35 was again my camera of choice to carry this past fall while vacationing along Minnesota’s shoreline of Lake Superior.

In November of 1905 a single storm damaged 29 ships in this area, and prompted congress to appropriate $75,000 for a lighthouse. Split Rock Lighthouse began operation in 1910, and operated until 1969. The lighthouse was originally only reachable by water, and the lighthouse keepers lived in the houses built on-site. Their isolation made life difficult until the 1930’s, when a highway was built that allowed their families to come and stay with them.

The lamp was built by Barbier, Bernard and Turenne Company in Paris, and spins by the power of a weight that was hand-cranked to the top, much like a giant grandfather clock. The massive fresnel lens spins easily by floating on a bearing surface of mercury. Originally the lamp burned kerosene, but it was later converted to an incandescent bulb.

If you’re in the area, it’s worth stopping in for a tour.

Images shot on Fujicolor Superia 200 film.

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5 Comments on “Split Rock Lighthouse – Yashica Electro 35”

  1. Great photos! I have to of the Yashicas and they have awesome lenses.

  2. Jim says:

    Nice work. I especially like the shots of the fresnel surface on the lighthouse’s lamp.

  3. Derek says:

    The Electro 35 worked like a champ!

  4. Jeff says:

    I agree it is worth a visit. I like the photos. Looks like the Yashica is doing well. Happy shooting, from a fellow MN film-shooter.

  5. Stephan Pot says:

    Beautiful images. I can’t wait for my Yashica to arrive 🙂


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